Andrew L.

Dublin Core

Title

Andrew L.

Description

His family roots lie on the Korean peninsula in both North and South Korea.

Creator

Andrew L.

PDF Search

Text

Andrew * 
 
 
History is a broad subject, and often times individuals or families are 
overlooked, however, they are as much a part of history as any major historical 
incident. My family has lived and experienced many historical events and we are a 
part of history. My family’s story begins with my grand parents. 
 

My grandfather was born in what is now known as North Korea, and my 

grandmother was born in the South. They both lead rather sedentary, simple lives 
until war broke loose. With the Northern army advancing south, my grandfather, 
escaped with his family to the south. Unfortunately, he was separated from his 
family. He eventually got to the South, but at the cost of his loved ones. Years later, 
he was able to reach his brother who also successfully escaped South, and learned of 
his mother, who was unfortunately still up North. She recently passed away, and due 
to the split of Korea, he was unable to see her. There is no information about the 
other members of his family. 
 

My grandmother, on the other hand, was lucky and lived on the southern tip 

of the peninsula and was sheltered from the experience my grandfather endured. He 
lived as an orphan in South Korea until he ran away and started his life. He met my 
grandmother and they had four kids, including my mother. In 1970, they 
immigrated to the United States. It took them a while to get acclimated to American 
culture and unfortunately the first major event she can remember as a child is the 
Water Gate Scandal. 
 

In the mid 1970’s Atari was released and became the first major videogame 

console to be sold in a retail venue. This was a huge hit with my uncles, and it’s a 

passion they still carry with them to this day. My uncles were also passionate 
hockey fans (how Koreans developed passion for hockey, I don’t know), and the 
1980 USA Hockey team victory over their Russian counterparts was a huge moment 
in their lives. They weren’t able to attend but they watched every second of the 
game from their little television at home. 
 

My mom described the Challenger explosion as a surreal moment in her life. 

It was one thing to watch history, and it is another to watch tragedy as it unfolded. 
In 1988, I was born, and that’s a small historical event in its self. Two of my uncles 
were also army Rangers and both were deployed into Kuwait for the start of the Gulf 
War. Both came home unharmed.  
 

I was still young so I don’t remember my recollections of the Oklahoma City 

bombings but my mom remembers being at work and finding about it. She said she 
was never so shocked from watching the news, at that moment anyway. Then came 
the attacks on 9/11, and the shock factor was incomparable. I was in middle school 
English class when our teacher broke the news. My parents came and picked my 
sister and I from school and we drove home in silence. We really didn’t know how to 
react; this was a first for us. We also had the pleasure of witnessing the inauguration 
of the United States’ first African‐American President. 
 

While our history may not show up in a history book, it still has value. 

History is the story of the world, from the smallest to the biggest entity. 
 

 

Citation

Andrew L., “Andrew L.,” Historical Memory:, accessed September 26, 2018, http://memory.ctevans.net/items/show/3.

Output Formats

Document Viewer