Cheryl W.

Dublin Core

Title

Cheryl W.

Description

Extended family originated in Germany and many relatives were involved in both world wars.

Creator

Cheryl W.

PDF Search

Text

Cheryl * 
 
 
When I married my husband we created a mix of family histories to pass down to our 
children.  One branch of my family tree comes from Germany following World War 1 and my 
husband has a branch of his family that comes from Germany after participating in World War 
2.  Although our families share a similar cultural heritage as Germans they had very different 
experiences as German citizens. 
 

My great‐grandmother lived in Wiesbaden, Germany until 1926.  Wiesbaden is situated 

a little over 100 miles from the French border.  Her experience during World War 1 would have 
been one of great hardship.  Although Wiesbaden did not receive any damage during the war, 
all of Germany was unable to get supplies due to a naval blockade held by Britain for the 
duration of the war.  German families were asked to give up materials that could be used in the 
war effort.  My family was not of great means and would have been very hard hit by the 
shortage of food and supplies. 
 

After World War 1, my great‐grandmother married an allied soldier and returned with 

him to the states.  They became farmers in Maryland and unfortunately for them they soon 
were in the great depression that began in 1929 with the stock market crash.  They were able 
to maintain their farm throughout those hard times and even became a family of modest 
means.  My great‐grandparents were very hard working and I feel the struggles that my great‐
grandmother lived through helped to create her resilient nature and indomitable spirit.   
 

My grandfather was raised with a sense of "American pride" as he called it.  They were 

not allowed to speak German in their household because of concern for the opinions of others 
and my great‐grandmother's desire to fit in with other American families.  My grandfather even 

enlisted to fight in World War 2, although he was denied for medical reasons.  So much of our 
German heritage was taken from my family when my great‐grandmother left Germany with so 
little of her belongings and then even more so when she attempted to assimilate into American 
society.  She did not talk about Germany and said it brought back sad memories.  All that has 
been left to us are pictures in old photo albums. 
 

My husband's grandmother lived in Bayreuth, Germany until 1950. Bayreuth is located 

on the eastern side of Germany near the Czech Republic.  Bayreuth was the capital of the Nazi 
Gau of Bavarian Ostmark during the war.  Both my husband's grandfather and great‐uncle 
fought as Nazi Soldiers.  His grandfather was an SS officer who was killed during a weapons 
malfunction in his initial training and his great‐uncle was killed in Russia as a tank operator. The 
hardship of being a widowed mother to a small child in the war and losing her only brother 
must have been very hard on the family.   A few years later after re‐marrying the son of an 
Ukrainian officer, who was in a relocation camp in Bayreuth, the family relocated to the United 
States and became small business owners in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. My husband's mother 
joined them in 1958 after finishing her education in Europe and they had developed a very 
successful and profitable business. 
 

Their experience during World War 1 was very much the same as my great‐

grandmother.  During World War 2, however, the food supplies were not limited in the same 
way and Germany began the war as a military powerhouse.  Germans, at that time,  were fed a 
steady diet of Nazi propaganda that created a euphoria in favor of the war.  It seems like it was 
a misplaced sense of German pride that embraced the hope for a new and better life for the 
German people.      

 

My husband's grandmother, until her death, did not believe that the version of facts 

told by the Allies about World War 2 were true. Whether it was a sense of guilt or loyalty to her 
German roots, she chose to believe the best of what she was told during her life in Germany.  
My mother‐in‐law said she did not know many details about Nazi Germany until she left 
because they were not spoken of in her history classes.  The history of my husband's family has 
left him with a strong sense of German heritage.  America became a chance for their family to 
make a new life when things became hard in Germany after the war.  Their family had lived 
through bombings and Nazi propaganda and came out with a resilience and strength that 
brought them through the hardship of two world wars. 
 

I trust my children will be able to learn from our family history and the lessons that 

history affords all of us.  I hope I can teach them how to avoid the mistakes of those who came 
before us and create a world and history their children can be proud of.    

Files

Citation

Cheryl W., “Cheryl W.,” Historical Memory:, accessed March 8, 2021, https://memory.ctevans.net/items/show/6.

Output Formats

Document Viewer