Kristen R.

Dublin Core

Title

Kristen R.

Description

Living in northeastern Pennsylvania, this family lived through the economic depression that swept the area in the 1970s (along with the destruction of Hurricane Agnes).

Creator

Kristen R.

PDF Search

Text

Kristen * 
Before I start my family’s short timeline of events I would like to explain some gaps, in 
our family tree. I believe that this will give you better insight as to why I am choosing to write 
about some key family members that although they have had a direct affect on my life, they 
would not necessarily be seen as a direct linage (ei: my great uncle). 
My mother and her siblings were separated when they were very young; my mother 
was left in the care of her grandparents because of her tender age of nine months old. Her two 
older siblings were said to be in care of my grandfather, an alcoholic, who later returned only to 
leave the older two children in the care of my great grandmother. My maternal grandmother 
was said to have had a mental break and after leaving my grandfather did not return or make 
any further contact. So for the purposes of this report, please understand that those who have 
information seem unwilling to diverge more than the fact that my grandfather James Pryce was 
a vet of the Korean War and had an issue with alcohol. Though it may sound sad, it is what it is, 
as they say.  
Originally from the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania, both my maternal and paternal 
sides have long and extensive roots in business and family. With both families immigrating pre‐ 
World War II the ability to track family members during this time was quite simple. I have only 
one direct relative who was a participant in World War II that returned home to Wilkes‐Barre, 
Pa. my grandfather Joseph *. He enlisted at the age of seventeen and was assigned as a cook 
for a naval ship. Upon his return to Wilkes‐Barre, he opened his first restaurant with help from 
a cousin. Coming from an Italian American family they worked off of general family receipts and 

opened strictly for breakfast and lunch, providing a deli like environment for the department 
stores and local companies of the main business square. In 1951 my grandfather married a first 
generation Russian‐ American Sofia O*, together they would go on to open three restaurants 
and have three children one of which is my father Richard *. 
During this same time frame my maternal family, of Welsh decent, was making their pre 
and post war contributions by working in the ever slowing coal mines of Northeastern 
Pennsylvania. In the late 1800's and early 1900's thousands of immigrants relocated to the 
region to work the anthracite coal mines. This transformed the Wyoming Valley from a small 
farming area to a metropolis, but after the war, the industry slowed and many workers needed 
to redirect their employment efforts. Bertram *, though not quite of retirement age was 
relieved of his duties in the early 1950’s from the mines; from here I do not have an accurate 
account of his working history.  In 1970 he passed away of a heart attack in his sleep, leaving his 
wife Loretta and oldest son Bertram Jr. to financial support the three young children. Bertram 
was able to help support his mother with financial affairs by the running of a local gas station 
which later purchased and ran for twenty years. My mother the youngest of the three children 
would continue to have these two family members be her support system till she married. 
On June 23, 1972, tropical storm Agnes swept through the area. In her path, the storm 
left nothing but destruction. A total of eighteen inches of rain left 25,000 homes nearly 
destroyed, and $1 billion in damages. The river rose to 40.9 feet, 18.9 feet above flood stage, 
although 2,278 businesses in Wilkes‐Barre were damaged by the 9 feet of water that flooded 
the square, may areas where able to rebound. Unfortunately the family’s restaurants were not 

one of them. Without the proper insurance for the businesses the family had to start over. The 
new concept was to keep things simple and The Hut was opened. This location catered to the 
Wilkes and King’s College students providing burgers and light fare.  This location later closed in 
the late 1988, putting them out of the restaurant business again. On quite literally the other 
side of town the * family worked at rebuilding their gas station. The building set slightly higher 
and inland did not receive as much damage and was opened back to full capacity rather quickly.  
My parents meet in the early 1980’s, my father became the owner and operator of the 
Wyoming Valley’s first gym that later expanded to a fitness center and health club. With the 
growing demand for a health country and awareness on the rise for health matters my father 
had a very successful thirty‐one years in the industry before selling his establishment this year. 
My mother left college at the age of twenty to pursue a family life, though she did not complete 
her degree she made great advancements in the medical field.  
I often think our lives on paper are quit boring. For me it is the makeup of our family 
dynamic that must truly be seen in person that makes for the best stories. It is our dramas, our 
ups and downs and personal hardships that just could not fit in the confines of a few pages. The 
best I can give you here are the mile stones to which we reached, and our most notable 
through our work ethic. I hope this provides you with some insight in to a family that stems 
from a small area where most people have lived died and never really left.  

Files

Citation

Kristen R., “Kristen R.,” Historical Memory:, accessed March 8, 2021, https://memory.ctevans.net/items/show/9.

Output Formats

Document Viewer